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IMO delays diesel emission controls giving yachts until 2021

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The looming deadline for large diesel-powered recreational vessels to install emission controls has been delayed five years.

 

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has delayed the implementation of a U.S. EPA-sponsored rule that would have required diesel-powered recreational vessels over 24m (about 80 feet) to install emission control after treatment, according to a statement by the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA).

 

The EPA rule proposed a 2016 implementation date for all vessels. The five-year delay that the IMO adopted in early April sets the implementation date for recreational yachts as Jan. 1, 2021.

 

The EPA has already finalized catalyst-based diesel regulations on ships sold in the U.S., excluding recreational yachts. By working with the IMO, the agency had hoped with this new rule to control emissions from vessels that enter U.S. waters, including recreational vessels.

 

NMMA and the International Council of Marine Industry Associations (ICOMIA) lobbied for the delay, saying the technical and economic challenges of a catalyst-based rule for recreational yachts would be too large. The size of a catalyst often requires a re-design of the boat’s engine compartment, NMMA said in a statement.

 

In addition, diesel catalyst requires urea, an ammonia solution not stored at marinas that are often visited by recreational yachts. “Recreational yachts are insignificant contributors of emissions and their benefit is not supported by the cost of the rule,” the NMMA statement reads.

 

NMMA, ICOMIA, and the U.S. and Marshall Island representatives on IMO, supported delaying the rule for recreational vessels for five years, providing yacht builders and engine manufacturers time to prepare.

Read the NMMA’s statement about this here:

http://www.nmma.org/article.aspx?id=18908

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