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Triton survey: Readers comment on Cuba

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We asked respondents if they thought yachts should visit Cuba and if they thought the infrastructure was yacht ready.

(Read Triton Survey: Cuba here.)

The country’s infrastructure is not ready, but they can handle some yachts for sure, with limited facilities. Anchorages are available in some locations. Resort facilities exist in the more popular beach areas. Hemingway is the only really decent-sized marina in the entire country.

It is a bit of an adventure down south. Good fishing, but somewhat restrictive. It’s great to see once.

Infrastructure in Cuba, generally speaking for all purposes, is a bit behind due to reasons we all know, but they are trying. As as far as I know, they have plans to develop and build more and bigger marinas. There was a project going on in Varadero for big yachts.

Not 100 percent ready, and seeing yachts splash around money is a concern for that economy. I think too much too fast will hurt them.

They want us and have for years. I know of foreign-flagged boats that go. The infrastructure is not “yachtie” but we anchor out in other places. Heck, Monaco has really screwed up power and it is incredibly popular. Cuba’s coastline is almost as long as Florida’s. Lots of cool places to explore.

The people of Cuba would appreciate the business. You have to remember that the rest of the world is visiting Cuba have businesses there, hotels and such.

From what I have heard, no. However, with 30 years in yachting, there was no infrastructure anywhere in the old days. That’s the challenge and the beauty of cruising a yacht. We don’t need marinas and agents; it’s just a convenience (and sometimes a PITA).

I don’t think so but if they have fuel, we’re self sufficient otherwise. It’s about time, dammit.

I’m not sure but I’m preparing my business plan now. Plan to sail from Cancun on a regular basis.

You don’t need a marina to go cruising. As long as you can provision and fuel, what more do you need?

I’ve never been there but from what I understand, it’s beautiful. If you can keep your expectations low, you will be pleasantly surprised. I’ve been to lesser developed regions of the world on a yacht and had some of the best times of my yachting life. In my opinion, land was created so boats would have a place to visit. If you don’t like it, just cast off and leave. It’s really that simple.

The infrastructure was not at all ready when we were there in 2006. Except for the Hemingway Marina, we just stayed at anchor. The navigation aids were minimal. It was a great trip, but that was a mindset of the crew, not so much the location.

It’s an island. If you don’t take it with you, it is probably not there.

I think anyone visiting would have to put on their patient hat and prepare vessel and crew as if they were voyaging much further afield than a hundred miles from the U.S. coast.

Go now before it changes.

I was there 15 years ago and it was ready. I can only assume it’s gotten better.

The infrastructure is basic but that’s the big draw. Virgin cruising at its best.

It’s interesting to go once, but that is enough. There are better places to go for everything except the culture.

Plenty of yachts travel to remote and rustic areas. The crew are very resourceful in pulling off magic in places that may not be five-star capable. But then again, that’s part of the fun of the job and gives the crew and captain a chance to shows off their skills.

Yachts need to come. It’s an amazing destination. Infrastructure is not ready yet, but once they build it, they will come.

No the infrastructure is in very poor condition. They are not ready at all for a large influx of yachts. I kept a 40-foot sailboat there for 12 years. I also brought a 115-foot motoryacht there several times. They have no spare parts but lots of good will.

As a captain, I am bound to keep my crew, guests and yacht out of harm’s way. Why would I take a chance until the restrictions are lifted? There are too many other beautiful places to go. Why would I support a communist dictator who has persecuted and murdered his own countrymen over the past 50 years?

Lifting the embargo and moving the nation toward more free exchange with the world can only improve infrastructure development and gradually introduce the Cuban citizens to a less oppressive way of life and greater economic opportunity. You can control a people, but you cannot control an idea.

I tend to doubt they can handle the number of vessels that will want to go right away. The demand is going to be huge, one day. Soon?

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