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Emily Warburton-Adams weighs in from Below Deck

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Bravo reality TV show “Below Deck” began its fourth season on Sept. 6, portraying life among yacht crew and charter guests. The 14-episode series takes place on the 154-foot M/Y Valor in the British Virgin Islands under the command of veteran mariner Capt. Lee Rosbach.

We asked Stew Emily Warburton-Adams, 21, a few questions about her experience onboard. Her responses have been edited by Bravo. To follow Warburton-Adams, visit her website at www.english-emily.com.

Tell us about your yachting history.

I’ve worked in yachting for nearly three years. I made my way up to second stew on a 160-foot yacht after my first season, and then took a position as stew/masseuse on a 200-foot yacht in my second year.

Over my time on boats, I have cruised around the Med, passaged through the Corinth Canal to Greece, and traveled to Turkey. I then crossed the Atlantic to the Caribbean and the British Virgin Islands.

My yachting experiences have been incredible, and I’ve seen things that I could have never witnessed on land. It is tough work and very tiring, but I love to embrace what we’re lucky enough to be offered. I used any free time I had to explore the locations, swim and take in the beautiful views.

BELOW DECK -- Season:4 Emily Warburton-Adams Photo by: Virginia Sherwood/Bravo)

BELOW DECK — Season:4 Emily Warburton-Adams Photo by: Virginia Sherwood/Bravo)

What did you expect to be a challenge when you started on “Below Deck”?

I was preparing myself for the challenge of being thrown into a charter almost immediately, without knowing the other crew members.

What do you wish people knew about life onboard during “Below Deck”?

The work is as hard, if not harder, than chartering on a normal superyacht. There is the added pressure of cameras in the already tight spaces on board, and your every move is being watched by a load of producers.

What surprised you most about working on “Below Deck”?

I learned a lot about myself yourself; my tolerance to pressure, my ability to think rapidly and how good I was at reading people.

What was the same as work on another yacht?

Everything, from bed-making and suitcase unpacking to toilet paper folding, turn-arounds after charter, re-stocking crew areas and provisioning. You name it, we had to do it. It’s a fully functioning yacht with functioning yacht crew being filmed, and put under more pressure than normal.

What was different?

Other than being filmed? I had less time for myself. And it was harder to get to know my crew mates properly. Also, the guests were more interested in me as a person, rather than being another stew.

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