The Triton

Career

The Yachtie Glow: Have a plan to help you survive the job hunt

ADVERTISEMENT

The Yachtie Glow: by Angela Orecchio

When you first arrive in port looking for work, you’re excited about the adventures and opportunities on the way. You also may be nervous because you’re away from home and there is uncertainty and the risk of not finding a job right away.

Excitement and nervousness are completely normal and every crew experiences them to some extent. How you deal with these emotions will make or break your first few weeks of looking for a job.

Get organized

Now is the time to set your goals if you haven’t already. Get a clear idea of what you want out of yachting and visualize it becoming a reality each day.

Write down your plan each week. Decide which crew agents you’ll go to, what times you’ll look for work online, when you’ll dockwalk and update your CV.  Also, include when you’ll do personal items such as fitness, social media, going out with friends and talking with family back home. This plan will keep you focused despite the endless distractions that will present themselves.

Create a financial budget for yourself so that you know what you have and what you need in order to keep looking for work if it doesn’t come right away. You should have enough savings to get you through at least three to six months.

Stay healthy

Make sure you continue to eat well, exercise, drink enough water and get enough sleep while looking for work. If you take care of yourself physically, mentally and emotionally, you will naturally be more attractive as a candidate for work than someone who doesn’t.

Network and socialize

Socializing online and in person with other yacht crew is important for building a network of people who know and support you while finding a job. The yachting community is tightknit and small, and someone always knows someone who might get you the job of your dreams.

Keep your socializing professional. What you do in the bar and in the crew house will get around. You want to be known as someone people can trust and recommend.

Educate yourself

If you have the chance, take extra yacht-related courses such as flower arranging or more Silver Service. This always looks good on your CV, builds your skills and shows you are serious about becoming a top-notch stewardess.

Angela Orecchio is a chief stew, certified fitness instructor and health coach. This column was edited from her blog, Savvy Stewardess, The Smart Girl’s Guide to Yachting (www.savvystewardess.com). Comments are welcome below.

Related Posts...
The Yachtie Glow: by Angela Orecchio My first job at Read more...
Many stewardesses gain weight while working on board a yacht Read more...
Yachtie Glow: by Angela Orecchio While I care a great Read more...
The Yachtie Glow: by Stew Angela Orecchio Yacht crew have Read more...
The Yachtie Glow: by Stew Angela Orecchio Even if you’re Read more...

Share This Post

About Angela Orecchio

Angela Orecchio is a chief stew and certified health coach. This column was edited from blog, Savvy Stewardess, The Smart Girl’s Guide to Yachting. Contact her through www.savvystewardess.com.

View all posts by Angela Orecchio →

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please answer the question below to leave a comment. * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

Editor’s Picks

Fort Pierce yard gets another chance

Fort Pierce yard gets another chance

County commissioners in St. Lucie County voted yesterday to buy 12 acres of land in the Port of Fort Pierce for $25 million and operate a …

Hurricane Maria impacts Caribbean as a major storm

Hurricane Maria impacts Caribbean as a major storm

UPDATE: Wed., Sept. 20 Click for Hurricane Maria update for Sept. 20 from Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS)'s …

Competition, workshops for interior crew at Monaco

Competition, workshops for interior crew at Monaco

Stews, don't miss the chance to strut your stuff at the Monaco Yacht Show this year. G.U.E.S.T. (Guidelines for Unified Excellence in …

Windowless cars, damaged boats, rare flights aid Tortola escape after Hurricane Irma

Windowless cars, damaged boats, rare flights aid Tortola escape after Hurricane Irma

By Dorie Cox The first frightening trip was out the door of the hotel bathroom. Four charter boat guests stood up from the floor of …