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Yacht’s seaplane landed, did not crash

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By Dorie Cox

A seaplane that landed in the water off the coast of Maine and was towed by a tender to its home on a yacht was mistakenly reported as an accident.

The yacht captain, who asked not to be named, said the landing and tow was standard procedure for the amphibious light-sport aircraft that was being used in a photo shoot in the waters near Cape Neddick, Maine, on Friday (Aug. 25). The captain believed that someone must have become concerned and called for emergency assistance.

“From shore, someone assumed there was a problem,” the captain said by phone. “It was a non-event. There was no crash.”

Jim Peters, public affairs specialist with the Federal Aviation Administration in New York, said inspectors were sent to the yacht where they confirmed the flight and tow were part of routine operations for the yacht. The inspectors interviewed both the captain and the pilot and Peters said no change of procedure is required for future similar operations.
“To their credit, people will call when they think someone may need help,” Peters said by phone. “And to their credit, the emergency responders were there.

Local media reported the situation as an accident. The plane, an Icon A5, has the ability to take-off and land on both land and sea and is loaded and offloaded by a crane on the yacht, the captain said.

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About Dorie Cox

Dorie Cox is editor of The Triton.

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2 thoughts on “Yacht’s seaplane landed, did not crash

  1. Joe

    The Icon A5 has its own set of problems. Sounds like they need a better trained pilot and not a wanna-be who doubles as crew. Captain trying to cover his tracks here.

  2. John Wampler

    When I was doing training for the seaplane rating add-on to my pilot certificate, we would practice water landings/takeoffs in Everglades near I-75. Upon return to FXE the tower would ask where we had been operating. Many times motorists would call BSO to report of aircraft “going down” in the Everglades. It happens.

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