Write to be heard: Yachts should be abiding by regulations

Feb 7, 2013 by Guest Writer

A couple of things jumped out at me from your article on the Moran symposium [“New rules on hours of rest concern captains, industry,” page A1, January issue].

These regulations are not new. We are supposed to have been abiding by them for years. If you must work beyond the allowed hours due to limited number of crew, then the way that this is possible is to add this to the contract or standing orders.

Note: It is collectively understood and agreed that we will work outside these regulations for short periods, but get more rest off charter.

We are generally able to give a day off, from time to time, in the season (which would clearly never happen on a commercial vessel). Then you are all covered.

Happily enough, on this boat we manage to keep within the regs, anyway. My feeling is that long term, you are not going to provide a better level of service with tired people by simply making them work ridiculous hours, quite apart from the safety aspect of it.

Competent, experienced, well-trained, well-prepared crew will obviously get more done in fewer hours. If we have inexperienced people in senior positions ineffectively managing junior crew, then they will be running around inefficiently for more hours than would otherwise be needed to provide the level of service that we are striving for.

As always, this starts at the top with owners and managers hiring under-experienced, minimally trained captains who then hire the rest of the crew and the problem self-perpetuates.

Also, the dates you have for implementation of BNWAS are not correct. We do not need one on here until June 2014. (We are 498GT).

Capt. Chris Lewis
M/Y Ellix Too

Editor’s Note: To clarify compliance dates for BNWAS: New yachts with keels laid on or after July 1, 2011, should be in compliance. For existing vessels, compliance is based on tonnage: 3,000 tons and greater were due July 1, 2012; vessels between 500-2,999 gross tons should comply by July 1, 2013, and vessels 150-499 gross tons should comply by July 1, 2014.

Topics:


Related Articles

The Yachtie Glow: Sleep or exercise? Which is better after working long hours?

The Yachtie Glow: Sleep or exercise? Which is better after working long hours?

The Yachtie Glow: by Angela Orecchio After working long days on board, stews often wonder if they should skip their exercise and sleep more the next day. The answer completely

Crew Coach: Understanding emotions an advantage

Crew Coach: Understanding emotions an advantage

Crew Coach: by Capt. Rob Gannon Recognizing our emotions and their effects can be an important competency in our working and private lives. Unfortunately, we can get so wrapped

It’s lights, camera, action at yacht crew film festival

The stars were out at the 6th annual Fort Yachtie Da International Film Festival on Nov. 16 in Ft. Lauderdale. Throughout the year yacht crew filmed aspects of yachting

Crew Compass: New Year’s bucket list proves how fortunate crew life is

Crew Compass: New Year’s bucket list proves how fortunate crew life is

Crew Compass: by Chef/Stew Lauren Loudon On a New Year’s charter a few years back, we had guests who very kindly insisted the crew join them for a post-dinner

Triton Survey: More say they won’t attend FLIBS2020

Triton Survey: More say they won’t attend FLIBS2020

By Lucy Chabot Reed The latest update to our industry-wide survey reveals that almost 60% of the 560 people who took part will not attend the Fort Lauderdale International

Latest in the brokerage fleet: New Heesen sells; Dorothea III listed

Latest in the brokerage fleet: New Heesen sells; Dorothea III listed

Yachts sold YN19055 Project Castor, the latest in Heesen’s 180-foot (55m) FDHF Steel class, sold by Luxury Yacht Group broker Rupert Connor, who brought the buyer, and Thom Conboy