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The Crew’s Mess: Chimichurri Beef Steak

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When cooking for one’s self or one’s crewmates, simplicity is the rule. However, that doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice good quality and taste.



I like to keep it friendly with the butcher at my supermarket so I can manage my meat purchases and meal planning around special deals in the meat section. This is especially true when whole pork loin or London broil is buy one, get one free. During this time, I load up the freezer.



What most supermarkets call London broil is not a cut of meat, but rather a type of cooking. London broil is typically a top round roast cut into smaller two-and-a-half-inch steaks.



This is a lean cut of meat, and it is moderately tough. Lack of fat and marbling makes round dry out when cooked with dry-heat cooking methods such as roasting or grilling.



For this reason, it is preferable to marinate or slow cook with moist-heat or braising, such as in a crock pot stew or soup.



Chimichurri Beef Steak

 

2½ lbs of London broil

1 bottle non-creamy Caesar salad dressing

½ cup fresh parsley, chopped

2 tablespoons crushed red pepper

Salt and pepper



To make the marinade, mix all ingredients (except the meat) in a large gallon-size zip-top bag. Set aside 1/3 cup of the marinade.



Add the beef and marinate for six hours or overnight. I like to use zip-top bags because it allows me to massage the beef a couple of times while it marinates without making a mess. This enhances the tenderizing of the beef.



Remove the beef and discard the marinade. Place beef on grill over medium ash-covered coals. Grill uncovered for 16-20 minutes until medium rare, turning occasionally. For broiling, place on a rack 4 inches from heat source. Broil 8 minutes one side, turning once, and then 8 minutes on the other until the internal temperature of the meat is no more than 150 degrees.

 


Remove and let stand for 5 minutes before cutting diagonally across the grain. Serve with or without reserved marinade. Enjoy.



Capt. John Wampler has worked on yachts big and small for more than 25 years. He’s created a repertoire of quick, tasty meals for crew to prepare for themselves to give the chef a break. Contact him through www.yachtaide.com. Comments on this column are welcome at editorial@the-triton.com.

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