Oceania acquires shipyards

Jul 10, 2013 by Guest Writer

Oceania Marina has acquired two shipyards in Port Whangarei, New Zealand. The properties total almost 20 acres of land and buildings, making Oceania one of the larger shipyards in the region.



“We are pleased to confirm that we have purchased the freehold of our shipyard property,” said directors Martin and Shannon Gleeson. “This, combined with the signing of a long lease for another shipyard facility close by, ensures that our company has long-term security as well as the ability to significantly expand the services that we offer.”



The combined property holdings include refit sheds, paint sheds, specialist fabrication facilities, workshops, stores and offices. It also gives Oceania access to deep water for larger and deeper draft vessels.

Development plans include introducing more flexible and larger capacity haul and launch facilities. The acquisitions enhance new-build construction potential as well.



“We operate an 800-ton conventional slipway, which is configured for vessels in the range of 20 to 55 metres, and have successfully developed a niche between smaller travelift operations and the larger commercial shipyards,” Martin Gleeson said in a news announcement. “To grow our business, we need to cater for a wider range of vessels and improve vessel transportation capabilities to hardstand or undercover spaces.”



The leasehold property was formerly operated by BAE Systems for the construction of vessels for the New Zealand Navy. Energy Vessels Offshore Ltd., in which Oceania has a 50 percent interest, is expected to have a significant presence at the site constructing new vessels for the offshore energy industry.



Also planned is a Marine Service Center to be operated by Port Whangarei Ltd., owned by Oceania, to cater for a different type of business. No other details were immediately available.



For more information, visit www.oceaniamarine.co.nz.

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