Megaship transits Suez

Sep 6, 2013 by Guest Writer

The world’s largest ship transited the Suez Canal on Aug. 9. M/V Mærsk Mc-Kinney Møller, the first Triple-E vessel, is 1,309 feet (399m) long with a beam of 194 feet (59m) and a depth of 99 feet (30m). It registers at 194,849 GT. It has a speed of 23 knots.



Opened for traffic in 1869, the Suez Canal is the oldest man-made canal in the world. Maersk Line sends an average of 27 container ships through Suez every week.



The canal is too narrow for ships to pass each other, so all ships enter through convoys on fixed times. It usually takes between 12 and 16 hours for a ship to go through the canal.



The Chairman of the Suez Canal Authority (SCA) and SCA officials joined the vessel to celebrate the occasion.

“We received a cake from the chairman, which we had on the bridge after lunch,” wrote the captains on their blog at maersklinesocial.com. “A very good cake indeed.”



PHOTO/MAERSK LINE

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