Naiad launches electric stabilizers

Dec 6, 2014 by Guest Writer

Connecticut-based Naiad Dynamics, a manufacturer of ship motion control technologies, has introduced the first products in a new line of electric-powered stabilizer systems for use on ships operating both AtSpeed and AtRest.

“These new stabilizers are a modern refinement of electric-powered stabilizers Naiad first developed for naval applications in 2008,” said John Venables, CEO of Naiad Dynamics. “We are now introducing these systems to the recreational and commercial marine markets … to provide a choice for designers and builders who may prefer not to use hydraulics.”

The initial model E-525 is available with a 7.5 or 11 kW AC servo motor drive, and is designed for fin sizes ranging from 1.0 to more than 3.5 square meters for vessels typically 35-50m in length. The company will roll out additional electric-powered systems through 2015 and 2016.

The electric stabilizer eliminates the hydraulic system, reducing the number of installed components and the system’s overall complexity and weight. Its electric servo motor-actuator design generates the same amount of force as two hydraulic cylinders used in an equivalent hydraulic stabilizer model, the company said in a news release.

A key safety feature of Naiad’s electric fin stabilizer design is the ability to center the fins manually and lock in place when the stabilizer is not being operated.

For more information, visit www.naiad.com.

 

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