The Triton

News

Vessels out of the dredge loop getting stuck in the ICW

Posted on by in
ADVERTISEMENT

By Suzette Cook

Diamonds are a girl’s best friend is the phrase vessels need to remember as they travel the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) in Ft. Lauderdale for the next year as Cashman Dredging and Marine Contracting Co. continues its effort to deepen the channel to 15 feet.

As of June 3, at least 7 vessels have gone aground trying to navigate around dredge equipment incorrectly.

The dredge Captain A.J. Fournier will be working on the Intracoastal Waterway Deepening Project between the SE 17th Street Bridge and the Las Olas Bridge weekdays and on select weekends from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.  

On Friday June 3 while Capt. Herbert Magney was passing the dredge operation on the west side in water measuring 11 feet deep, an 85-foot Benetti chose to navigate to the east side and went aground at low tide.

By 3 p.m. the yacht, which was arriving from another country and hadn’t cleared U.S. Customs yet, was waiting for the tide to roll in.

An 85-foot Benetti went aground trying to pass the dredge barge on the wrong side on June 3. (PHOTO/SUZETTE COOK)

An 85-foot Benetti went aground trying to pass the dredge barge on the wrong side on June 3. (PHOTO/SUZETTE COOK)

Capt. Dean Chambers who is in charge of the Captain A.J. Fournier  dredge said this is the 7th vessel that has gone aground trying to pass the dredge on the wrong side.

Chambers said that while a lot of captains have been contacting him on channel  13,16 or 67, not every vessel coming from another country or out of town has reached out to him and might be unaware of the deepening project.

“He’s still flying a customs flag so I’m assuming he’s coming from another country and he was unaware,” Chambers said about the latest vessel to misjudge the passage. “It looks like he was just coming in from Bimini.”

“I get several calls from captains every day,” Chambers said. “They have plenty of room to pass.You go on the diamond side, on the green side.”

Chambers advice for clear passage: “Slow down and pay attention to the chart and the channel marker and they’ll be alright.”

Barney Hauf director of sales at TowBoatU.S. in Ft. Lauderdale said his crew has helped out five of those vessels that have gone aground since the deepening project began on May 2.

Hauf said his two boat operators report that some of the stranded vessels appear to be watching the dredge operation activity and losing focus of the markers.

“Stay in the channel,” is Hauf’s advice.

“There’s a bifurcation channel when you’re coming westbound from Bahia Mar. Go left or right and line up the next marker.”

Stephen Tobin, vice president of Cashman Dredging and Marine Contracting Co.  encourages mariners to stay in the loop on dredge location and activity by emailing a request for the information of daily dredge locations and news to IWWDredgePosition@jaycashman.com.  

To read more about the deepening project click on this month’s cover story in The Triton.

Suzette Cook is editor at The Triton. Reach her at suzette@the-triton.com

 

Original post June 3, 2016.

By Suzette Cook

Diamonds are a girl’s best friend is the phrase vessels need to remember as they travel the Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) in Ft. Lauderdale for the next year and especially this Saturday.

Stephen Tobin, vice president of Cashman Dredging and Marine Contracting Co.  announced on Friday (June 3) that the dredge Captain A.J. Fournier will be working on the Intracoastal Waterway Deepening Project between the SE 17th Street Bridge and the Las Olas Bridge from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on June 4. So far, the operation has been conducted Monday through Friday but Cashman has added 12 hours of operation on Saturday this week. 

A dredge position map depicting position of dredge will be sent out to anyone interested in receiving daily updates by emailing a request for the information to IWWDredgePosition@jaycashman.com.

On Friday June 3 while Capt. Herbert Magney was passing the dredge operation on the west side in water measuring 11 feet deep, an 85-foot Benetti chose to navigate to the east side and went aground at low tide.

By 3 p.m. the yacht, which was arriving from another country and hadn’t cleared U.S. Customs yet, was waiting for the tide to roll in.

An 85-foot Benetti went aground trying to pass the dredge barge on the wrong side on June 3. (PHOTO/SUZETTE COOK)

An 85-foot Benetti went aground trying to pass the dredge barge on the wrong side on June 3. (PHOTO/SUZETTE COOK)

Capt. Dean Chambers, who is in charge of the Captain A.J. Fournier  dredge, said this is the 7th vessel that has gone aground trying to pass the dredge on the wrong side.

Chambers said that while a lot of captains have been contacting him on radio channel 13,16 or 67, not every vessel coming from another country or out of town has reached out to him and might be unaware of the deepening project.

“He’s still flying a customs flag so I’m assuming he’s coming from another country and he was unaware,” Chambers said about the latest vessel to misjudge the passage. “It looks like he was just coming in from Bimini.”

“I get several calls from captains every day,” Chambers said. “They have plenty of room to pass.You go on the diamond side, on the green side.”

Chambers advice for clear passage: “Slow down and pay attention to the chart and the channel marker and they’ll be alright.”

Barney Hauf director of sales at TowBoatU.S. in Ft. Lauderdale said his crew have helped out five of those vessels that have gone aground since the deepening project began on May 2.

Daily updates show exactly where the dredge will happen each day.

Daily updates show exactly where the dredge will happen each day.

“Stay in the channel,” is Hauf’s advice.

“There’s a bifurcation channel when you’re coming westbound from Bahia Mar. Go left or right and line up the next marker.”

To read more about the deepening project click on this month’s cover story in The Triton.


Suzette Cook is editor at The Triton. Reach her at suzette@the-triton.com

About Dorie Cox

Dorie Cox is editor of The Triton.

View all posts by Dorie Cox →

Related Articles

Random drug testing needed

Your recent survey regarding drug use in the yachting industry revealed how many different opinions there are regarding this very hot topic. (“Crew see drugs in industry, not onboard,” …

Electric outboard is DAME winner

The Deep Blue Electric Outboard by Torqeedo GmbH of Germany won this year’s overall DAME award at METS in Amsterdam in November.The engine is “an exceptional example of groundbreaking …

Builders launch new yachts

Palmer Johnson has launched the 213-foot (65m) M/Y Lady M with Moran Yacht & Ship. Built under project name Stimulus, the yacht was scheduled to be delivered in May.  The 198-foot (60m) …

Crew Coach: Honest view of conflict requires clear, calm state of mind

Crew Coach: by Capt. Rob Gannon Isn’t it great when we are working on a crew or a team and everything is flowing nicely? Lots of smooth sailing and calm seas, with things getting done and …

Body found in waters at Bahia Mar Marina

A body was found floating in the water at Bahia Mar Marina in Ft. Lauderdale this morning at about 7:22 a.m. Fort Lauderdale Police Department responded to the call and found a deceased adult, white …

Owner behavior can make captains’ job hard

 Running a megayacht takes finesse. There’s a fine line between the owner’s enjoyment of what is hopefully a hobby and the business of operating a multimillion-dollar corporation. …

Comments