The Triton

Where in the World

Builder finds anti-heeling system

ADVERTISEMENT

A custom yacht under construction turned to commercial company Circor to eliminate unwanted heeling during crane operations. The customer was looking for a system providing dynamic counterweights – an anti-heeling system. Such a system must be designed to automatically shift ballast water from one side to the other in a continuous, dynamic operation.

Onboard this superyacht, low levels of noise and vibration were important for passenger comfort, so an anti-heeling system that was quiet and didn’t generate much residual vibration or structure-borne noise was needed. In addition, the superyacht had limited installation space available.

The shipyard reached out to Allweiler with their requirements, and Allweiler designed a system accordingly — an Allweiler Anti-Heeling system based on a centrifugal pump.

Allweiler transferred technology from other marine markets, such as Navy and research vessels where low levels of noise and vibration are crucial, and merchant marine markets where the level of accuracy is generally higher than for pleasure yachts.

The pump operates at ultra-low speed and is controlled by a variable speed drive with prolonged ramp-up time. Operating a centrifugal pump at lower than normal speed prevents wear on rotating parts such as impellers and bearings and enables the pump to operate with less noise and less vibration. Slower pump speed also creates better suction capabilities. This is achieved as water speed inside the pump casing is reduced. With reduced water speed, the risk of water hammering in the ship’s piping (leading to noise, vibration and possibly damaging piping and valves) is reduced. The low pump speed also removes any risk of cavitation, another source of noise and vibration.

The pump, drive and valves in the yacht’s anti-heeling system are all controlled by the CIRCOR control system, which is also connected to an inclinometer that monitors the yacht’s inclination with accuracy down to 0,04°. The system may be manually or automatically operated.

For maximum safety, the system has a fail-safe arrangement including automatic shut-down and complies with DNV-GL class rules and regulations. 

Related Posts...
Yachts sold Heesen’s YN 20067 Project Sparta, a 220-foot (67m) Read more...
New in the sales fleet M/Y Royal Falcon One, a Read more...
M/Y Balista, a 153-foot (46m) Cantieri Di Pisa in 2013, Read more...
Yachts sold Project SkyFall, a 193.6-foot (59m) aluminum, 900GT custom Read more...
Ocean Independence has moved its Fort Lauderdale office to a Read more...

Share This Post

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please answer the question below to leave a comment. * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Editor’s Picks

From the Bridge: Yachts mix it up with cash, cards, wires, apps

From the Bridge: Yachts mix it up with cash, cards, wires, apps

From the Bridge: by Dorie Cox It’s the same on every boat: Money makes the yacht go ’round. Yet, surprisingly, the way money is …

Next up: Triton Networking with Baglietto

Next up: Triton Networking with Baglietto

Triton Networking is excited to visit the offices of one of our newest advertisers, Italian yacht builder Baglietto, on the third …

Crew’s Mess: Poutine de Poulet

Crew’s Mess: Poutine de Poulet

Crew's Mess: by Capt. John Wampler Oh, November. In the pastoral world of the North, the cord wood has been stacked by the door. Smoke …

Triton Networking with Ronnie’s at UMC

Triton Networking with Ronnie’s at UMC

Just days after the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show, more than 200 yacht captains, crew and business professionals gathered for …