The Triton

Crew Life

Captain publishes book about cancer ordeal

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By Lucy Chabot Reed

Capt. Wendy Umla has published a book about her recent experience battling cancer. Titled “Healthy People Get Cancer, Too,” Capt. Umla approaches the serious topic with full honesty and a touch of humor.

She described the book as a compilation of helpful hints for healthy people going through a major health issue. She kept a journal throughout her year-long ordeal that began when she noticed a small lump in her groin, then through tests, a diagnosis and six rounds of chemo.

“The purpose of initially writing was to help me understand what I was going through and to document what I was doing,” she said. “I realized as I met other people going through it that they hadn’t done a lot of the things I figured out to make it easier. If I can help one person, it’s worth it.”

Capt. Wendy Umla with Bear, who helped her through cancer. Photo by Lucy Reed

Capt. Umla, a fit woman with a previous career in the health and fitness world, noticed that lump and talked to a doctor about it. She was soon diagnosed with stage 2 non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. Her cancer has been in remission since October 2018.

“I’m a captain,” she said. “I’m used to dealing with stuff hitting the fan, looking at all the data, sorting through it and making decisions. That’s how I handled this.”

That method is not for everyone, she acknowledged, but for those who want the information, she tried to give it in a straightforward way. Read more at healthycancerbook.com.

“It’s scary, that fear of the unknown,” she said. “I just wanted to take away some of the fear when people are first diagnosed.”

Lucy Chabot Reed is publisher of The Triton. Comments are welcome below.

About Lucy Chabot Reed

Lucy Chabot Reed is publisher and founding editor of The Triton.

View all posts by Lucy Chabot Reed →

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