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Transport ship departs Palma after ballast incident

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By Lucy Chabot Reed
Photos by Estela Shipping Agency

DYT transport ship M/V Super Servant 4, departed Palma this morning en route to Genoa after losing power and suffering a ballast malfunction while offloading on June 8.

According to a company statement, the vessel resumed safe ballast operations on Saturday (June 13) and loaded several more yachts bound for Genoa and Florida. DYT acknowledged that there were “minor damages” to the yachts on board, and said they are being handled through the marine cargo insurance. (Scroll down to see photos from the incident.)

“All precautions were taken, the vessel and the incident were heavily investigated and the necessary measures have been put in place to avoid this from happening in the future,” the statement read. 

DYT released this statement today:

Super Servant 4 departed Palma with cargo safely on board following earlier incident.
Amsterdam, 16 June 2020 – On Monday morning June 8th DYT’s semi-submersible vessel Super Servant 4 unexpectedly listed heavily to starboard during sail-out. Due to an electrical failure, a limited amount of ballast water transferred from port to starboard side. This combined with smaller electrical issues led to heavy listing of the carrier. All precautions were taken, the vessel and the incident were heavily investigated and the necessary measures have been put in place to avoid this from happening in the future.
On Saturday 13 June, the Super Servant 4 safely resumed ballast operations and loaded several more yachts bound for Genoa and Florida. This morning the vessel departed from Palma to deliver her remaining cargo in Genoa.
The Master on board Super Servant 4 took quick action to get the vessel and yacht crew on board to safety. Two tugboats were called to assist the vessel alongside the quay. After the electric failure was resolved by the crew, the listing was reduced, and the focus was on safely unloading the yachts on board.
The vessel was thoroughly inspected, and in close cooperation with the authorities various tests were performed. When the situation was clear and safe the vessel continued operations and the yachts were loaded.
We would like to clarify that the Super Servant 4 is a submersible vessel. The carrier is designed to submerge (controlled “sinking”), if needed, even below the visible catwalks. DYT is not minimizing the incident but feel it’s necessary to emphasize the carrier was not sinking.
Conclusion
Thanks to the quick response by all parties involved, there were no injuries, no marine pollution and the damages to Super Servant 4 were minimal. There were minor damages reported to the yachts on board all of which are currently in the process of being handled by the Marine Cargo Insurance in place.
We regret this incident took place, for our clients and concerned bystanders.
Our sincere apologies for any inconvenience to the parties involved, especially our valued customers.
DYT Yacht Transport will continue to learn from this incident and work towards delivering an improved version of the level of service our clients have come to expect.

UPDATED: June 10, 8:30 am; ORIGINAL POST: Monday, June 8
A transport ship carrying seven superyachts and other cargo lost power as it was submerging to offload this morning in Palma, listing severely to starboard. No one was injured, but several of the yachts came to rest aside each other. 

M/V Super Servant 4, operated by Fort Lauderdale-based DYT Yacht Transport, was in the process of being righted this afternoon, according to DYT General Manager Laura Tempest.

“The cause of the loss of power is still being investigated,” she said. “We don’t know the extent of the damage to the cargo, but the vessel’s integrity is intact.”

Video courtesy of Estela Shipping Agency

Yacht crew traveling with their vessels were disembarked safely ashore when the power was lost, Tempest said. The transport ship’s final destination is Genoa.

“The pictures are frightening to look at, but it’s important to remember, these are submersible vessels,” Tempest said. “They are made for this. Luckily, no one was hurt, and it looks like the damages will be quite small. It could have been a lot worse.”

DYT released this statement soon after the incident:

Super Servant 4 faces ballasting problem in Palma
Amsterdam, June 8th – On Monday morning June 8th DYT’s semi-submersible vessel Super Servant 4 faced a ballasting problem during load-out in Palma, Mallorca (Spain). As a result, the vessel has listed to starboard. Presently, the situation is under control. There have been no injuries or marine pollution and all steps are being taken to recover the situation as quickly as possible. All precautionary matters have been taken to ensure the crew, the vessel, the yachts she is carrying and the environment are safe.
At this moment it is still uncertain whether the vessel or her cargo have sustained damage.
We sincerely regret this situation and are working hard to resolve the present state of affairs.

It released this statement this morning (June 10):

Super Servant 4 undamaged after ballasting problem in Palma
Amsterdam, June 10th – Yesterday evening the last of seven yachts on DYT’s semi-submersible vessel Super Servant 4 in Palma was safely discharged.
On Monday morning June 8th the Super Servant 4 faced a ballasting problem during load-out in Palma, Mallorca (Spain). As a result, the vessel listed to starboard with the cargo still on board.
There were no injuries or marine pollution. In close cooperation with authorities all steps were taken to recover the situation as quickly as possible and discharge the yachts safely and without damage.
Today a full survey will be held on the yachts to assess possible damages and we will continue normal operations. Upon completion Super Servant 4 will start her planned voyage to Genoa.

About Lucy Chabot Reed

Lucy Chabot Reed is publisher and founding editor of The Triton.

View all posts by Lucy Chabot Reed →

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Comments

3 thoughts on “Transport ship departs Palma after ballast incident

  1. Rick

    Good article, thanks.
    I gather when electric power was lost they could not use hydraulics so could not close ballast valves. Could they use the manual valves?
    But I’m curious who is it that edits these photo and removes the vessels names?

  2. Lucy Chabot Reed Post author

    This is how the photos came to us. DYT did not release the names of the vessels onboard.

  3. W

    The assumption that ballast valves were hydraulic is odd. Most remotely operated valves are operated by mechanical, pneumatic or electrically drivers. Mechanical i.e. by reach rod, pneumatic air driven with pressure vessel dedicated, electrical motor driven. If ballast system was part of a regulatory approved SOLAS system the electrical would be DC and have battery back-up not just a AC/DC transformer. The first 2 could work if flooding had occurred at the valve questioned, the 3 would probably not work.

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